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Advanced Placement

AP Exam Schedule 2017

 

Week 1

Morning 8 am

Afternoon 12 noon

Monday

May 1, 2017

 

Psychology

Tuesday

May 2, 2017

Spanish Language and Culture

Physics 1: Algebra-Based

Wednesday

May 3, 2017

 

 

Thursday

May 4, 2017

 

Seminar

Friday

May 5, 2017

United States History

 

Computer Science Principles

 

Week 2

Morning 8 am

Afternoon 12 noon

Monday

May 8, 2017

Biology

 

 

Tuesday

May 9, 2017

Calculus AB

 

Calculus BC

 

Wednesday

May 10, 2017

English Language & Composition

 

Thursday

May 11, 2017

 

Statistics

Friday

May 12, 2017

Human Geography

 

 

 

AP Program

CAMS offers 12 AP courses. Three are required: AP United States History in 11th grade; AP English Language and Composition in 12th grade; and one AP math course (AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC or AP Statistics). Students may choose to take more AP courses as electives. We offer the following courses:

 

AP Biology AP Physics 1
AP Calculus AB AP Psychology
AP Calculus BC AP Statistics
AP Computer Science Principles AP Seminar
AP English Language and Composition AP Spanish Language and Culture
AP Human Geography AP United States History

 

We encourage students, parents, and families to click on the following link,

Resources for Parents and Families, as the booklet has useful information.

AP Course Descriptions

 

Capstone

AP Seminar engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and literary, and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence based arguments.

 

 

English

AP English Language & Composition aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.


 

History and Social Sciences

AP Human Geography is equivalent to an introductory college-level course in human geography. The course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. The curriculum reflects the goals of the National Geography Standards (2012). 

 

AP Psychology introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.

 

AP United States History focuses on the development of historical thinking skills (chronological reasoning, comparing and contextualizing, crafting historical arguments, using historical evidence, and interpreting and synthesizing historical narrative) and the development of students’ abilities to think conceptually about U. S. history from approximately 1491 to present. Seven themes of equal importance - American and National Identity; Migration and Settlement; Politics and Power; Work, Exchange, and Technology; America in the World; Geography and the Environment; and Culture and Society - provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. These require students to reason historically about continuity and change over time and make comparisons among various historical developments in different times and places The course also allows teachers flexibility across nine different periods of U.S. history to teach topics of their choice in depth.

 

 

Mathematics and Computer Science

AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problem when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

 

AP Calculus BC is roughly equivalent to both first and second semester college calculus courses and extends the content learned in AB to different types of equations and introduces the topic of sequences and series. The AP course covers topics in differential and integral calculus, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and series. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problem when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

 

AP Computer Science Principles is designed to be equivalent to a first-semester introductory college computing course. In this course, students will develop computational thinking vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize, and draw conclusions from trends. The course is unique in its focus on fostering student creativity. Students are encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts and to think creatively while using computer software and other technology to explore questions that interest them. They will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills, working individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discussing and writing about the importance of these problems and the impacts to their community, society, and the world.

 

AP Statistics is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course on statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: exploring data; sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding.


 

Sciences

AP Biology is an introductory college-level biology course. Students cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular processes – energy and communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions. Approximately, 25% of instruction time will be spent in hands-on laboratory work.

 

AP Physics 1 is an algebra based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory simple circuits. Approximately, 25% of instruction time will be spent in hands-on laboratory work.


 

World Languages and Cultures

AP Spanish Language and Culture emphasizes communication (understanding and being understood by others) by applying interpersonal, interpretive, and presentation skills in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course strives not to overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught exclusively in Spanish.  The AP Spanish Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of cultural products (e.g., tools, books, music, laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions).

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